24.07.2012 Delage D8-120 Coupé Sport 1937

Clique sobre a foto para ver em tamanho maior
Delage
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Founded 1905
Founder(s) Louis Delage
Defunct 1953
Headquarters Levallois-Perret, France
Products Cars

Delage was a French luxury automobile and racecar company founded in 1905 by Louis Delage in Levallois-Perret near Paris; it was acquired by Delahaye in 1935 and ceased operation in 1953.


History

The company was founded in 1905 by Louis Delage; its first location was on the Rue Cormeilles in Levallois-Perret. The company was initially just an assembly plant, buying engines and chassis from other manufacturers, and adding only the body. The first model was a Delage Type A motor-cylinder De Dion Bouton 9 ch.

In 1907 the factory moved to the Rue Baudin Levallois, where a 4,000 square meter workshop allowed it to grow. That year, Delage won the Grand Prix des Voiturettes at Dieppe (500 km), at an average speed of 80 km/h (50 mph).

In 1908, the success enabled the development of the factory and entry into more Grand Prix races. After an increase in sales, the existing facilities were too small, so in 1912 the factory moved to a new facility on the Boulevard de Verdun in Courbevoie. The following year saw the creation of advanced bodywork.

Delage continued to win important races until the outbreak of the First World War in 1914, when the new plant in Courbevoie was converted to military use.

Competition

In 1911, the Delage Type X, designed by the engineer Michelat, won the Coupe de l'Auto at Boulogne.

In 1913, the new type Y set the fasted lap time at the French Grand Prix at Le Mans, and in 1914, this same car won the 1914 Indianapolis 500 with René Thomas at the wheel.

In 1914, Delage emphasized its focus on competition by creating the type O Lyon Grand Prix, while at the same time moving towards the luxury car market with 6 cylinders of a large class.

With the war, production of passenger cars virtually stopped, with the exception of some fabrication for the Army. But the Delage factories were running full support for the war effort.


In 1918, after the return of peace, Delage sold the CO, plans for which had been drawn up during the conflict; this was the first passenger car with front brakes. With these brakes and an engine of 20 hp (a six-cylinder 4524 cc), in 1921 it became the CO2, which did the Paris-Nice run in 16 hours, an average of 67 km/h (42 mph).

The 1920s were really the first "Golden Age" of Delage. The most famous were the DE and DI: 4 cylinders of about 2 liters and 11 hp. Delage also attempted to compete with Hispano-Suiza, with the GL of 30 hp and 5954 cc, with some success. After that came a new generation of six-cylinder cars, like the MD (3174 cc) and DR (2516 cc), the best-selling vehicle in the history of the brand, designed by engineer Gaultier.

In 1923 Louis Delage returned to competition with the innovative 12-cylinder 2-liter type 2 LCV. This car won the 1924 European Grand Prix in Lyon and the 1925 Grand Prix of ACF Montlhéry. The 12-cylinder DH (10,5 liters) of 1924 beat the world speed record on the highway, at 230 km/h (143 mph).[citation needed] A Delage 155 B won the first Grand Prix of Great-Britain in 1926, driven by Louis Wagner and Robert Senechal. The production of cars continued with the DI and the DI S SS. The DM evolved into the DMS and DML, equipped with a 6-cylinder 3-liter engine designed by Maurice Gaultier. Always passionate about racing, Louis Delage designed an 8-cylinder 1500 cc, the type 15 S 8. This car won four European Grands Prix races in 1927, and won Delage the title "World Champion of Car Builders" that same year.

In 1930 Maurice Gaultier designed an 8-cylinder in-line 4,061 cc, evolving the type D8 into the type D8 S (S for Sport).


But the backlash of the economic crisis of 1929 arrived and manufacturers of luxury cars all over the world suffered from poor sales. The commercial and financial situation of the firm is badly shaken. In 1932 Delage introduced the type D6-11 (6-cylinder 2101 cc), and two years later the new eight-cylinder Delage, type D8-15 (2768 cc). These two models, equipped with independent front wheel suspension did not increase sale figures. The last models to emerge from the factory in Courbevoie were the types D6-65, D8-85 and D8-105, designed by engineer Michelat. On 20 April 1935 the factory in Courbevoie goes into voluntary liquidation.

But Louis Delage would not admit defeat, and with the help of a businessman called Walter Watney created the Société Nouvelle des Automobiles Delage (SAFAD), to market Delage cars, assembled from production Delahayes. This union created the 4-cylinder DI 12 and the D8 120, and also the 6-cylinder D6 70. Watney had taken control as president of SAFAD, but he was a British national and in June 1940 he was obliged to leave Paris as the German army arrived.[1] Watney stayed in France, at his villa in Beaulieu[disambiguation needed], until the end of 1942 after the Germans had completed their occupation, but already in December 1940 the presidency of the SAFAD business had passed directly into the control of Delahaye.[1] In any event, since the outbreak of the war Delage had been largely inactive, although they did undertake work on a project to replace the six-cylinder engine of the Hotchkiss H39 tank with the more powerful 8-cylinder unit from the Delage D8 120.[1]

After the Second World War

A large prototype Delage D-180 limousine appeared at the 1946 Paris Motor Show but there were evidently no further developments on this project and by the next year the big prototype had quietly disappeared.[2] At the 1947 Paris Motor Show only a single model was exhibited as the business focused on its six-cylinder 3-litre Delage D6[2] which in most respects will have been familiar to anyone who had known the 3-litre Delages of the 1930s. The car was offered with bodies by firms such as Chapron, Letourner & Marchand and Guilloré. A variety of coupe and cabriolet bodied D6s were produced. In addition, both Guilloré and Chapron produced a large saloon/sedan body. The two were remarkably similar to one another, both being six-light four-door cars with conservative 1930s style shapes. Something else the two had in common was unexpectedly narrow rear doors, enforced by the combination of a long body, a long rear overhang and a relatively short wheelbase provided by the D6 chassis.[2] A longer wheelbase 1952 special version, bodied by Guilloré, was owned by National Assembly president Edouard Herriot.[3]

Nevertheless, these were difficult times for luxury auto-makers in France and by now the company's registered head office was the same as that for Delahaye: production statistics from the period group Delage and Delahaye together.[3] Louis Delâge himself, who had lived in poverty and quasi-monatic isolation since bankruptcy in 1935 had enforced the transfer of his company to Delahaye, died in December 1947, and during the next few years any residual autonomy that the business had enjoyed disappeared.[2] Increases in motoring taxes, most notably in 1948 and most savagely targeting cars with engines of above 2 litres, combined with the depressed economic conditions of post-war France to create a difficult market for luxury car manufacturers. In 1950 Delahaye produced 235 cars which will have included a significant number of Delages. In 1951 the combined production figure for the two brands slumped to 77: in 1952 it was down to 41.[3] In 1953 Delage production ended.

Models

Delage CO (1918, 6 cyl, 4,524 cc)
Delage DI (1920, 2,121 cc)
Delage CO2 (1921)
Delage 2 LCV (1923, 12 cyl, 2L)
Delage GL (5,954 cc)
Delage DE
Delage DH (12 cyl DH, 10,5L)
Delage DI S
Delage DI SS
Delage DMS (6 cyl, 3L)
Delage DML (6 cyl, 3L)
Delage 15 S 8 (8 cyl, 1,500 cc)
Delage GL (5,954 cc)
Delage DM (6 cyl, 3,174 cc)
Delage DR (6 cyl, 2,516 cc)
Delage D4
Delage D6-11 (6 cyl, 2,101 cc)
Delage D8-15 (2,768 cc)
Delage D6-65
Delage D8-85
Delage D8
Delage D8 S (8 cyl, 4,061 cc)
Delage D8-105
Delage DI 12 (4 cyl)
Delage D8 120
Delage D6 70 (6 cyl)
 
 
Home | O Clube | Galeria de Fotos | Eventos | Notícias | Recados | Cadastre-se | Classificados | Veículos | Contato